Andrew T. Fede, “Homicide Justified: The Legality of Killing Slaves in the United States and Atlantic World” (U Georgia Press, 2017)
Andrew T. Fede is a lawyer in private practice in northern New Jersey and an adjunct professor of law at Montclair State University.  His new book Homicide Justified: The Legality of Killing Slaves in the United States and Atlantic World (University of Georgia Press, 2017) is a comparative account of... Read More
Martha S. Jones, “Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Martha S. Jones, in her excellent new book Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America (Cambridge University Press, 2018), weaves together the legal and constitutional dimensions of citizenship—from the Founding documents and law cases with which  many scholars and students are familiar—with the daily civic engagement... Read More
David Ray Papke, “Containment and Condemnation: Law and the Oppression of the Urban Poor” (Michigan State UP, 2019)
The law does things, writes David Ray Papke, and it says things, and if we are talking about poor Americans, especially those living in big cities, what it does and says combine to function as powerfully oppressive forces that can much more likely be counted on to do harm than... Read More
Debra Thompson, “The Schematic State: Race, Transnationalism, and the Politics of the Census” (Cambridge UP, 2016)
Debra Thompson, in her award-winning* book The Schematic State: Race, Transnationalism, and the Politics of the Census (Cambridge University Press, 2016), explores the complexities of the politics of the census. This book, which unpacks the census itself, leads the reader to consider how this mundane tool actually translates the abstraction... Read More
Leigh Goodmark, “Decriminalizing Domestic Violence: A Balanced Policy Approach to Intimate Partner Violence” (U California Press, 2018)
Thanks to the efforts of activists concerned that the problem of “battered women” was being ignored — and treated as a private, family matter rather than a broader social problem — since the 1980s interpersonal/domestic violence has been treated as a criminal act enforced by the institutions of American criminal... Read More