New Books Network

James Gordon Finlayson, “The Habermas-Rawls Debate” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Jürgen Habermas and John Rawls are perhaps the two most renowned and influential figures in social and political philosophy of the second half of the twentieth century. In the 1990s, they had a famous exchange in the Journal of Philosophy. Quarreling over the merits of each other’s accounts of the... Read More
Elizabeth Bernstein, “Brokered Subjects: Sex, Trafficking and the Politics of Freedom” (U Chicago, 2018)
Jana Byars talks with Elizabeth Bernstein, Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Barnard College about her newest book, Brokered Subjects: Sex, Trafficking and the Politics of Freedom (University of Chicago, 2018). This book provides an overview of feminist discourse on sex trafficking from its earliest incarnations, through its... Read More
Michael Romano and Todd Curry, “Creating the Law: State Supreme Court Opinions and The Effect of Audiences” (Routledge, 2019)
In Creating the Law: State Supreme Court Opinions and The Effect of Audiences (Routledge, 2019), Michael Romano and Todd Curry examine whether judges tailor their language in order to avoid retribution during their retention elections. Using an extensive dataset that includes the text of all death penalty and education decisions... Read More
David McCraw, “Truth in Our Times: Inside the Fight for Press Freedom in the Age of Alternative Facts” (All Points Books, 2019)
The First Amendment and a strong Fourth Estate are essential to a healthy democracy. David McCraw spends his days making sure that journalists can do their work in the United States and around the world. This includes responding to libel suits and legal threats, reviewing stories that are likely to... Read More
Mary Anne Franks, “The Cult of the Constitution” (Stanford UP, 2019)
We Americans are defined by our Constitution and we cherish especially the First and Second Amendments. But like all texts, the Constitution can be read to empower and protect our individual rights, but it can also be used selectively, self-servingly, and in bad faith. And the Constitution guarantees two things:... Read More
William P. Hustwit, “Integration Now: Alexander v. Holmes and the End of Jim Crow Education” (UNC Press, 2019)
In this episode of Talking Legal History, Siobhan talks with William P. Hustwit about his book Integration Now: Alexander v. Holmes and the End of Jim Crow Education (UNC Press, 2019). Hustwit is the Associate Professor of History and Chair of the History Department at Birmingham-Southern College. Fifty years after the Supreme... Read More
S. Deborah Kang, “The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Today I talked to S. Deborah Kang about her book The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954, published by Oxford University Press in 2017. The INS on the Line explores the history behind Immigration and Naturalization Service throughout the 20th Century, interrogating how this... Read More