New Books Network

Victoria Reyes, “Global Borderlands: Fantasy, Violence, and Empire in Subic Bay, Philippines” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Increasing levels of globalization have led to the proliferation of spaces of international exchange. In her new book, Global Borderlands: Fantasy, Violence, and Empire in Subic Bay, Philippines (Stanford University Press, 2019), sociologist Victoria Reyes looks at one such space, the Subic Bay Freeport Zone, in the Philippines, to understand... Read More
Srdja Popovic, “Blueprint for Revolution” (Spiegel and Grau, 2015)
20 years ago, Srdja Popovic was part of a revolution — literally. He was a founding member of the Otpor! movement that ousted Serbia Slobodan Milsovic from power in 1999. It’s easy to characterize social movements as a bunch of people rallying in the streets, but successful movements require a... Read More
Sarah Marie Wiebe, “Everyday Exposure: Indigenous Mobilization and Environmental Justice in Canada’s Chemical Valley” (UBC Press, 2016)
In a foreword to Everyday Exposure: Indigenous Mobilization and Environmental Justice in Canada’s Chemical Valley (University of British Columbia Press, 2016), the public philosopher James Tully writes that, “Every once in a while, an outstanding work of scholarship comes along that transforms the way a seemingly intractable injustice is seen... Read More
James Gordon Finlayson, “The Habermas-Rawls Debate” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Jürgen Habermas and John Rawls are perhaps the two most renowned and influential figures in social and political philosophy of the second half of the twentieth century. In the 1990s, they had a famous exchange in the Journal of Philosophy. Quarreling over the merits of each other’s accounts of the... Read More
Jonathan Rothwell, “A Republic of Equals: A Manifesto for a Just Society” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Inequality in the U.S. has increased dramatically over the past decades — on that there is agreement. There is less agreement on the causes of that inequality, the consequences of it, and, perhaps least of all, what to do about it. Join us to hear Jonathan Rothwell talk about his... Read More
Richard J. Bernstein, “Why Read Hannah Arendt Now” (Polity, 2018)
Nobody should feel excited about the renewed relevance of Hannah Arendt’s work today. Her foresight about the fragility of democratic life is relevant for the worst possible reasons: populism, white supremacy, mass deception, the rise of fascism around the world, the coordinated assault on serious journalism, academia and any kind... Read More
Marcos González Hernando, “British Think Tanks After the 2008 Global Financial Crisis” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
How did the financial crisis of 2018 change politics? In British Think Tanks After the 2008 Global Financial Crisis (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), Marcos González Hernando, an Affiliated Researcher at the University of Cambridge and Senior Researcher at Think Tank for Action on Social Change (TASC), explores how think tanks were... Read More