New Books Network

Catherine Clark, “Paris and the Cliché of History: The City in Photographs, 1860-1970” (Oxford UP, 2018)
What’s the first image that comes to mind when you hear the words “Paris” and “photography”? Is it a famous photo, perhaps an Atget, Brassai, or Doisneau? In her new book, Paris and the Cliché of History: The City in Photographs, 1860-1970 (Oxford UP, 2018), Catherine Clark explores the history... Read More
Karen Cox, “Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South” (UNC Press, 2017)
Karen Cox, Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, discusses her new book, Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), and what one murder case in 1930s Mississippi reveals about race relations, criminal justice, and... Read More
Andrew C. Baker, “Bulldozer Revolutions: A Rural History of the Metropolitan South” (U Georgia Press, 2018)
The history of metropolitan expansion and suburbanization is often written from the perspective of the city. In Bulldozer Revolutions: A Rural History of the Metropolitan South (University of Georgia Press, 2018), by contrast, Andrew C. Baker focuses his gaze on the rural counties that underwent significant social, cultural, political, and... Read More
Steven White, “World War II and American Racial Politics: Public Opinion, the Presidency, and Civil Rights Advocacy” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
World War II played an important role in the trajectory of race and American political development, but the War’s effects were much more complex than many assume. In order to unpack these complexities and mine underutilized sources of public opinion data, Steven White had written World War II and American... Read More
Jolyon Baraka Thomas, “Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Jolyon Baraka Thomas’s Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan (University of Chicago Press, 2019) challenges the commonsensical notion that the Japanese empire granted its subjects no religious freedom—that, despite the legal provision in the Meiji Constitution of 1890 affirming freedom of worship, “State Shinto” was the law of the... Read More
Jon K. Lauck, “The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History” (U Iowa Press, 2013)
The guest this week on Historically Thinking is Jon Lauck. He’s the author of The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History (University of Iowa Press, 2013), which is several things at once: a brief illustration of the importance of the Midwest to both American and World History; the history... Read More
Nianshen Song, “Making Borders in Modern East Asia: The Tumen River Demarcation, 1881-1919” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Land borders in East Asia have played just as big a role in the region’s social transformations as their more recently debated maritime counterparts, and the boundary between China and Korea offers particularly telling insight into how society, identity and geopolitics have shifted over time. Nianshen Song’s Making Borders in... Read More