New Books Network

Margrit Pernau, “Emotions and Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor” (Oxford UP, 2020)
In her stunning and conceptually adventurous new book Emotions and Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor (Oxford University Press, 2020), Margrit Pernau examines the varied and hugely consequential expressions of and normative investments in emotions in modern South Asian Muslim thought. By considering a wide array of sources... Read More
Noel Malcolm, “Useful Enemies: Islam and the Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sir Noel Malcolm’s captivating new book, Useful Enemies: Islam and the Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750 (Oxford University Press, 2019), tells the story of Western European fascination with the Ottoman empire and Islam between the fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the latter half of the 18th century.... Read More
Robert Bartlett, “Against Demagogues: What Aristophanes Can Teach Us about the Perils of Populism and the Fate of Democracy” (U California Press, 2020)
With Against Demagogues: What Aristophanes Can Teach Us about the Perils of Populism and the Fate of Democracy (University of California Press, 2020) Robert Bartlett provides a stirring argument for the relevance of comic playwright Aristophanes as a serious political and philosophical thinker. In his translations of two lesser-known plays,... Read More
Elisabeth Paquette, “Universal Emancipation: Race Beyond Badiou” (U Minnesota Press, 2020)
What is Badiou’s theory of emancipation? For whom is this emancipation possible? Does emancipation entail an indifference to difference? In Universal Emancipation: Race Beyond Badiou (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) Elisabeth Paquette pursues these questions through a sustained conversation with decolonial theory, particularly the work of Sylvia Wynter. Through consideration of... Read More
Michael Walzer, “A Foreign Policy for the Left” (Yale UP, 2018)
In my old age, I try to argue more quietly, though I still believe that sharp disagreement is a sign of political seriousness. What engaged citizens think and say matters; we should aim to get it right and to defeat those who get it wrong. I understand the very limited... Read More
Tamura Lomax, “Jezebel Unhinged: Loosing the Black Female Body in Religion and Culture” (Duke UP, 2018)
One of the central threads in the public discourse on Black womanhood is the idea of the “Jezebel.” This trope deems Black women and girls as dishonorable and sexually deviant and the stereotype is circulated from the big screen to the pulpit. Tamura Lomax, Associate Professor at Michigan State University,... Read More
Adam Knowles, “Heidegger’s Fascist Affinities: A Politics of Silence” (Stanford UP, 2019)
The German philosopher Martin Heidegger’s influence over the last several decades of philosophy is undeniable, but his place in the canon has been called into question in recent years in the wake of the publication of his private journals kept throughout his life, including during his involvement with the Nazi... Read More
Spencer Critchley, “Patriots of Two Nations: Why Trump Was Inevitable and What Happens Next” (McDavid Media, 2020)
America is in a Cold Civil War, between people who see each other as threats to the country — but themselves as patriots. How can that be? They are patriots of two nations. In Patriots of Two Nations: Why Trump Was Inevitable and What Happens Next (McDavid Media), national media... Read More
Stefan Bauer, “The Invention of Papal History: Onofrio Panvinio between Renaissance and Catholic Reform” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Stefan Bauer has written an outstanding study of one of the most important Catholic historians in early modern Europe. Bauer, who has just taken up a new position teaching history at Warwick University, UK, has spent much of the last decade working on the life and work of Onofrio Panvinio.... Read More
Sree Padma, “Vicissitudes of the Goddess: Reconstructions of the Gramadevata in India’s Religious Traditions” (Oxford UP, 2013)
In Vicissitudes of the Goddess: Reconstructions of the Gramadevata in India’s Religious Traditions (Oxford UP, 2013), Padma (Bowdoin College) focuses on two types of Gramadevatas or goddesses: deified women and those associated with disease and fertility. Setting these figures in the context of their Brahmanic transformation into popular goddesses and... Read More