New Books Network

M. David Litwa, “How the Gospels Became History: Jesus and Mediterranean Myths” (Yale UP, 2019)
Did the early Christians believe their myths? Like most ancient—and modern—people, early Christians made efforts to present their myths in the most believable ways. In How the Gospels Became History: Jesus and Mediterranean Myths (Yale University Press, 2019), M. David Litwa explores how and why what later became the four... Read More
Max Oidtmann, “Forging the Golden Urn: The Qing Empire and the Politics of Reincarnation in Tibet” (Columbia UP, 2018)
In 1995, the People’s Republic of China resurrected the technology of the “Golden Urn,” a Qing-era tool which involves the identification of the reincarnations of prominent Tibetan Buddhist monks by drawing lots from a golden vessel. Why would the Chinese Communist Party revive this former ritual? What powers lie in... Read More
Mary-Elizabeth Murphy, “Jim Crow Capital: Women and Black Freedom Struggles in Washington, DC, 1920-1945” (UNC Press, 2018)
Though women’s roles in the black freedom struggle remain under-acknowledged, scholars continue to make their importance clear. In her new book, Jim Crow Capital: Women and Black Freedom Struggles in Washington, DC, 1920-1945 (University of North Carolina Press, 2018), Mary-Elizabeth Murphy (Associate Professor of History at Eastern Michigan University) examines black women’s... Read More
Daniel Veidlinger, “From Indra’s Net to Internet: Communication, Technology, and the Evolution of Buddhist Ideas” (U Hawaii Press, 2018)
In this episode of New Books in Buddhist Studies, I am joined by Daniel Veidlinger to discuss his exciting new book From Indra’s Net to Internet: Communication, Technology, and the Evolution of Buddhist Ideas (University of Hawaii Press, 2018), which offers a theoretically compelling exploration of the types communicative “ecosystems”... Read More
J. C. D. Clark, “Thomas Paine: Britain, America, and France in the Age of Enlightenment and Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2018)
There are few better guides to the “long eighteenth century” that J. C. D. Clark, emeritus professor of history at the University of Kansas, whose sequence of ground-breaking books have contested prevailing assumptions about religion, politics and early modernity even as they have worked to construct a chastened but compelling... Read More
David Gaunt, “Let Them Not Return” (Berghahn Books, 2017)
Sometimes it seems that there’s nothing left to say about mass violence in the 20th century.  But the new edited volume Let Them Not Return: Sayfo – The Genocide Against the Assyrian, Syriac, and Chaldean Christians in the Ottoman Empire (Berghahn Books, 2017), draws our attention to a conflict that... Read More
Jonathan G. Kline, “Keep Up Your Biblical Greek in 2 Minutes a Day” (Hendrickson, 2017)
The last few years have seen a proliferation of helps for those of us who struggle to consolidate and develop our knowledge of ancient languages. But here is one of the most helpful of these new resources. Jonathan G. Kline, who is academic editor at Hendrickson, and the author of... Read More