New Books Network

Kris Lane, “Potosí: The Silver City That Changed the World” (U California Press, 2019)
In 1545, a native Andean prospector hit pay dirt on a desolate red mountain in highland Bolivia. There followed the world’s greatest silver bonanza, making the Cerro Rico or “Rich Hill” and the Imperial Villa of Potosí instant legends, famous from Istanbul to Beijing. The Cerro Rico alone provided over... Read More
Jennifer Thomson, “The Wild and the Toxic: American Environmentalism and the Politics of Health” (UNC Press, 2019)
The first wealth is health, according to Emerson. Among health’s riches is its political potential. Few know this better than environmentalists. In her debut book, The Wild and the Toxic: American Environmentalism and the Politics of Health (UNC Press, 2019), historian Jennifer Thomson revisits canonical figures and events from the... Read More
Rosalyn LaPier, “Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet” (U Nebraska Press, 2017)
In Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet (University of Nebraska Press, 2017), author Rosalyn LaPier, an associate professor in environmental studies at the University of Montana, complicates several narratives about Native people and the nonhuman world. Rather than “living in harmony with nature,” as stereotyped... Read More
Kristin D. Phillips, “An Ethnography of Hunger: Politics, Subsistence, and the Unpredictable Grace of the Sun” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Families in parts of rural Tanzania regularly face periods when they cut back on their meals because their own food stocks are running short and they cannot afford to buy food. Kristin D. Phillips‘ new book An Ethnography of Hunger: Politics, Subsistence, and the Unpredictable Grace of the Sun (Indiana... Read More
Melissa Johnson, “Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize” (Rutgers UP, 2018)
Drawing from Sylvia Wynter’s call for rethinking our category of “human”, Melissa Johnson‘s ethnography Becoming Creole: Nature and Race in Belize (Rutgers University Press, 2018) demonstrates how entangled people are with the other-than-human that surrounds them. Mud, water, trees, animals and people form assemblages and shape particular identities. These relationships... Read More
Kenneth I. Helphand, “Lawrence Halprin” (Library of American Landscape History, 2017)
During a career spanning six decades, Lawrence Halprin (1916–2009) became one of the most prolific and outspoken landscape architects of his generation. He took on challenging new project types, developing a multidisciplinary practice while experimenting with adaptive reuse and ecological designs for new shopping malls, freeways, and urban parks. In... Read More