New Books Network

Thomas S. Mullaney, “The Chinese Deathscape: Grave Reform in Modern China” (Stanford UP, 2019)
In the past decade alone, more than ten million corpses have been exhumed and reburied across the Chinese landscape. The campaign has transformed China’s graveyards into sites of acute personal, social, political, and economic contestation. In The Chinese Deathscape. Grave Reform in Modern China, three historians of China, Jeffrey Snyder-Reinke,... Read More
William Germano, “Getting it Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books” (U Chicago Press, 2016)
When I put down Getting it Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books (University of Chicago Press, 2016), I looked up and began to wonder. I wondered about the book on gnomic poetry in Medieval Greek I had read over the weekend. I wondered about the... Read More
Margrit Pernau, “Emotions and Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor” (Oxford UP, 2020)
In her stunning and conceptually adventurous new book Emotions and Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor (Oxford University Press, 2020), Margrit Pernau examines the varied and hugely consequential expressions of and normative investments in emotions in modern South Asian Muslim thought. By considering a wide array of sources... Read More
Anne Louise Bannon, “Death of the Chinese Field Hands” (Healcroft House, 2020)
When Anne Louise Bannon heard her husband, then archivist for the City of Los Angeles, speak about how early Angelenos dug a large ditch (a zanja) to cull water from the Porciuncula River (now known as the Los Angeles River), her first thought was that the Zanja would be an... Read More
Lisa B. Thompson, “Underground, Monroe, and the Mamalogues: Three Plays” (Northwestern UP, 2020)
Lisa B. Thompson is equally renowned as a scholar of African and African-American studies and as a playwright. Her latest book Underground, Monroe, and the Mamalogues: Three Plays (Northwestern University Press 2020) collects plays from throughout her two decades as a playwright. “Underground” is a tense two-hander exploring themes of... Read More
Simone C. Drake, “Are You Entertained?: Black Popular Culture in the Twenty-First Century” (Duke UP, 2020)
Simone C. Drake and Dwan K. Henderson’s Are You Entertained?: Black Popular Culture in the Twenty-First Century (Duke UP, 2020) is an engaging and interdisciplinary exploration of contemporary black popular culture and how to think about this broad and diverse landscape, especially in relation to power, capitalism, gender identity, and presidential... Read More
Nadia Nurhussein, “Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America” (Princeton UP, 2019)
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern imperialism, Ethiopia... Read More
Robert Bartlett, “Against Demagogues: What Aristophanes Can Teach Us about the Perils of Populism and the Fate of Democracy” (U California Press, 2020)
With Against Demagogues: What Aristophanes Can Teach Us about the Perils of Populism and the Fate of Democracy (University of California Press, 2020) Robert Bartlett provides a stirring argument for the relevance of comic playwright Aristophanes as a serious political and philosophical thinker. In his translations of two lesser-known plays,... Read More
Heather Lende, “Of Bears and Ballots: An Alaskan Adventure in Small-Town Politics” (Algonquin Books, 2020)
Heather Lende was one of the thousands of women inspired to take a more active role in politics during the past few years. Though her entire campaign for assembly member in Haines, Alaska, cost less than $1,000, she won! But tiny, breathtakingly beautiful Haines—a place accessible from the nearest city,... Read More
D. Bilak and T. Nummedal, “Furnace and Fugue. A Digital Edition of Michael Maier’s ‘Atalanta fugiens’ (1618)” (U Virginia Press, 2020)
In 1618, on the eve of the Thirty Years’ War, the German alchemist and physician Michael Maier published Atalanta fugiens, an intriguing and complex musical alchemical emblem book designed to engage the ear, eye, and intellect. The book unfolds as a series of fifty emblems, each of which contains an... Read More