New Books Network

David Gaunt, “Let Them Not Return” (Berghahn Books, 2017)
Sometimes it seems that there’s nothing left to say about mass violence in the 20th century.  But the new edited volume Let Them Not Return: Sayfo – The Genocide Against the Assyrian, Syriac, and Chaldean Christians in the Ottoman Empire (Berghahn Books, 2017), draws our attention to a conflict that... Read More
Michael Lower, “The Tunis Crusade of 1270: A Mediterranean History” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Why was a Crusade that was initially meant for Syria end up in Tunis? How did the aspirations of the King of France and the Mamluk Sultan, the King of Sicily and the Hafsid Emir of Tunis, get entangled in the years following the Mongol invasion of the Middle East?... Read More
Sean Foley, “Changing Saudi Arabia: Art, Culture and Society in the Kingdom” (Lynne Rienner, 2019)
In Changing Saudi Arabia, Art, Culture and Society in the Kingdom (Lynne Rienner, 2019), Sean Foley offers eye-opening insights into a changing society that is under the international magnifying glass. Using the prism of an exploding arts scene populated by artists, comedians, actors, directors and masters of new media from... Read More
Robert Haug, “The Eastern Frontier: Limits of Empire in Late Antique and Early Medieval Central Asia” (I. B. Tauris, 2019)
Robert Haug’s new book, The Eastern Frontier: Limits of Empire in Late Antique and Early Medieval Central Asia (I. B. Tauris, 2019) is an in-depth look at the frontier zone of the Sassanian, Umayyad, and Abbasid Empires. Employing an impressive array of literary, archaeological, and numismatic sources, combined with a... Read More
Violet Moller, “The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found” (Doubleday, 2019)
Violet Moller has written a narrative history of the transmission of books from the ancient world to the modern. In The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found (Doubleday, 2019), Moller traces the histories of migration of three ancient authors, Euclid, Ptolemy and Galen,... Read More
David Stenner, “Globalizing Morocco: Transnational Activism and the Postcolonial State” (Stanford UP, 2019)
The story of Morocco’s independence struggle against France and Spain is a complicated one. Because it occurred around the same time of the long-running war for independence in Algeria, it has received greater scholarly attention. Moreover, Morocco’s continuing alignment with both the United States and France after 1956 has deemphasized... Read More
Emrah Şahin, “Faithful Encounters: Authorities and American Missionaries in the Ottoman Empire” (McGill-Queens UP, 2018)
The past decade has seen a tremendous production of scholarship on American missionary endeavors in the Middle East. In Faithful Encounters: Authorities and American Missionaries in the Ottoman Empire (McGill-Queens University Press, 2018), Emrah Şahin approaches this dynamic field of inquiry from a less-common perspective, that of the Ottoman Empire. Relying on largely... Read More