New Books Network

Jonathan Erickson, “Imagination in the Western Psyche: From Ancient Greece to Modern Neuroscience” (Routledge, 2019)
Imagination is one of the most important elements of being human, but is most often assumed we know what it is, while rarely being analyzed. Here with me today is Jonathan Erickson to discuss his recent book Imagination in the Western Psyche: From Ancient Greece to Modern Neuroscience (Routledge, 2019).... Read More
Babette Becker, “I Should Have Been Music” (Page Publishing, 2018)
Dr. Babette Becker’s memoir I Should Have Been Music (Page Publishing, 2018) recounts her experience as a patient in four different mental hospitals from 1957 to 1960. It was a time when little was known about mental illness, except the shame and horror of it, and nothing was known about... Read More
Taylor Pendergrass, “Six by Ten: Stories from Solitary” (Haymarket Books, 2018)
Long-term solitary confinement meets the legal definition of torture, and yet solitary confinement is used in every state in the United States. People are placed in solitary confinement for a variety of reasons, and long-term solitary confinement can have a harmful effect on mental and physical health. Reform is happening,... Read More
Nir Eyal, “Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
A former advisor to tech companies on how to make their products habit-forming, Nir Eyal found that his own smartphone use was adversely affecting his family life.  He took a deep dive into research and literature on the subject, and emerged with this new book (with Julie Li), Indistractable: How... Read More
Susan Opotow, “New York After 9/11” (Fordham UP, 2019)
The impact of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the country have been widely discussed—but what about the impact on New York City, specifically? In their new anthology, New York After 9/11 (Fordham University Press, 2018), Susan Opotow and Zachary Baron Shemtob examine how life in New York City was drastically... Read More
Richard Robb, “Willful: How We Choose What We Do” (Yale UP, 2019)
Tired of the mechanical, narrowly rational human behavior of the Chicago school, but not exactly comforted by the emphasis on irrational activity in behavioral economics? So am I. Richard Robb, professor at Columbia and fund manager, offers a third way. In Willful: How We Choose What We Do (Yale University... Read More
Brett Kahr, “Bombs in the Consulting Room: Surviving Psychological Shrapnel” (Routledge, 2019)
“I’m very happy to say I really really do love psychoanalysis. I think the insights are absolutely genius and I don’t think that I would be able to do any of my work if I didn’t have those ideas readily available to me.” In Bombs in the Consulting Room: Surviving... Read More