New Books Network

Kerim Yasar, “Electrified Voices: How the Telephone, Phonograph, and Radio Shaped Modern Japan, 1868-1945” (Columbia UP, 2018)
Electrified Voices: How the Telephone, Phonograph, and Radio Shaped Modern Japan, 1868-1945 (Columbia UP, 2018) explores the soundscapes of modernity in Japan. In this book, Kerim Yasar argues that modern technologies of sound reproduction and transmission have had profound—and often underappreciated—social, economic, and political effects. Observing that the “materialities of... Read More
Martin Collins, “A Telephone for the World: Iridium, Motorola, and the Making of a Global Age” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
It’s easy to take for granted that one can pick up a cell phone and call someone on the other side of the planet. But, until very recently, this had been a mere dream. Martin Collins’ A Telephone for the World: Iridium, Motorola, and the Making of a Global Age... Read More
Matthew Hersch, “Inventing the American Astronaut” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
It seems logical that would NASA select military test pilots to be the first astronauts, right? They were used to risk. They were good with machines. They already explored extreme environments. But these skills were not unique to test pilots. There were also mountaineers, scuba divers, and explorers. They too... Read More
Eric Topol, “Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again” (Basic Books, 2019)
Medicine has lost its humanity. Doctors no longer have the time to make personal connections with their patients. In his new book Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again (Basic Books, 2019), Eric Topol explores how AI can help to fix many of the issues medicine is... Read More
Chris Bernhardt, “Quantum Computing for Everyone” (MIT Press, 2019)
Today I talked with Chris Bernhardt about his book Quantum Computing for Everyone (MIT Press, 2019). This is a book that involves a lot of mathematics, but most of it is accessible to anyone who survived high school algebra.  Even a math-phobic can read the book, skip the math, and... Read More
Tom Wheeler, “From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future” (Brookings, 2019)
It’s easy to get sidetracked while writing a book. But imagine being interrupted by the President of the United States. That happened to Tom Wheeler, who was in the midst of writing a history of communication networks when President Obama appointed him to be chairman of the Federal Communications Commission... Read More
Kartik Hosanagar, “A Human’s Guide to Machine Intelligence: How Algorithms Are Shaping Our Lives” (Viking, 2019)
Our guest today is Kartik Hosanagar, the author of A Human’s Guide to Machine Intelligence: How Algorithms Are Shaping Our Lives and How We Can Stay in Control (Viking, 2019). This is one of those rare books that I think everyone can read and I think everyone should read. In... Read More