New Books Network

Donna Dickenson, “Me Medicine vs. We Medicine: Reclaiming Biotechnology for the Common Good” (Columbia UP, 2016)
Personalized healthcare―or what the award-winning author Donna Dickenson calls “Me Medicine”―is radically transforming our longstanding “one-size-fits-all” model. Technologies such as direct-to-consumer genetic testing, pharmacogenetically developed therapies in cancer care, private umbilical cord blood banking, and neurocognitive enhancement claim to cater to an individual’s specific biological character, and, in some cases,... Read More
Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra, “Automating Finance: Infrastructures, Engineers, and the Making of Electronic Markets” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
How are markets made? In Automating Finance: Infrastructures, Engineers, and the Making of Electronic Markets (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra, an assistant professor in sociology at the University of California, San Diego, explores the history of the finance industry to understand the role of markets and technologies in... Read More
Robert Atkinson and Michael Lind, “Big is Beautiful: Debunking the Myth of Small Business” (MIT Press, 2018)
Small is beautiful, right? Isn’t that what we’ve all been taught? From Jeffersonian politics to the hallowed family farm, from craft breweries to tech start ups in the garage. Small business is the engine and the soul and the driver of the American system. That’s the dominant narrative. And according... Read More
David Beer, “The Data Gaze: Capitalism, Power and Perception“ (Sage, 2019)
What is the social role of data? In The Data Gaze: Capitalism, Power and Perception (Sage, 2019), David Beer, a professor of sociology at the University of York, considers this question by introducing the concept of the data gaze. The book is the third in Beer’s loose trilogy of work... Read More
Kerim Yasar, “Electrified Voices: How the Telephone, Phonograph, and Radio Shaped Modern Japan, 1868-1945” (Columbia UP, 2018)
Electrified Voices: How the Telephone, Phonograph, and Radio Shaped Modern Japan, 1868-1945 (Columbia UP, 2018) explores the soundscapes of modernity in Japan. In this book, Kerim Yasar argues that modern technologies of sound reproduction and transmission have had profound—and often underappreciated—social, economic, and political effects. Observing that the “materialities of... Read More
Martin Collins, “A Telephone for the World: Iridium, Motorola, and the Making of a Global Age” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
It’s easy to take for granted that one can pick up a cell phone and call someone on the other side of the planet. But, until very recently, this had been a mere dream. Martin Collins’ A Telephone for the World: Iridium, Motorola, and the Making of a Global Age... Read More
Matthew Hersch, “Inventing the American Astronaut” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
It seems logical that would NASA select military test pilots to be the first astronauts, right? They were used to risk. They were good with machines. They already explored extreme environments. But these skills were not unique to test pilots. There were also mountaineers, scuba divers, and explorers. They too... Read More