New Books Network

Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, “The Good Drone: How Social Movements Democratize Surveillance” (MIT Press, 2020)
The Good Drone: How Social Movements Democratize Surveillance (MIT Press), by Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, demonstrates that this technology – which is mostly associated with covert surveillance and remote warfare – has also served as a vital tool for activists, social movements, and defenders of human rights to effect pro-social campaigns. Through... Read More
John W. Compton, “The End of Empathy: Why White Protestants Stopped Loving their Neighbors” (Oxford UP, 2020)
We’re all familiar with the statistic that 81% of white evangelical voters supported Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election. But what if a deeper trawl through the complex relationship between religion and political activity in modern America suggests that statistic doesn’t really mean anything? In this exciting new book,... Read More
Duane Tananbaum, “Herbert H. Lehman: A Political Biography” (SUNY Press, 2017)
Over the course of three decades of public service, Herbert Lehman dedicated himself tirelessly to advances the causes in which he believed. In Herbert H. Lehman: A Political Biography (SUNY Press, 2017), Duane Tananbaum describes his livelong public activism and the role Lehman’s relationships with key individuals played in shaping... Read More
Post Script: Kamala Harris as Vice President
This is our second podcast in a new series from New Books in Political Science called POST-SCRIPT in which Susan and I invite authors back to the podcast to react to contemporary political developments that engage their scholarship. Today’s podcast – recorded on Wednesday, August 12th (less than 24 hours... Read More
Andrea Benjamin, “Racial Coalition Building in Local Elections: Elite Cues and Cross-Ethnic Voting” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
What explains voting behavior in local elections? More specifically, what explains how ethnic and racial blocs vote in local elections, especially when the candidate may be of a different race or ethnicity? These are the main question animating the research in Racial Coalition Building in Local Elections: Elite Cues and... Read More
Caron Gentry, “Disordered Violence: How Gender, Race and Heteronormativity Structure Terrorism” (Edinburgh UP, 2020)
In Disordered Violence: How Gender, Race and Heteronormativity Structure Terrorism (Edinburgh University Press, 2020), Caron Gentry looks at how gender, race, and heteronormative expectations of public life shape Western understandings of terrorism as irrational, immoral and illegitimate. Gentry examines the profiles of 8 well-known terrorist actors. Gentry identifies the gendered,... Read More
Post Script: A Deep Dive on China
Todays begins a new set of podcasts from New Books in Political Science called POST-SCRIPT. Lilly Goren and I invite authors back to the podcast to react to contemporary political developments that engage their scholarship. In a podcast devoted to the concerning political developments in China, four scholars — from... Read More
David Livingstone Smith, “On Inhumanity: Dehumanization and How to Resist It” (Oxford UP 2020)
The phenomenon of dehumanization is associated with such atrocities as the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and the Holocaust in World War II. In these and other cases, people are described in ways that imply that they are less than fully human as a prelude to committing extreme forms of violence... Read More
W. J. Perry and T. Z. Collina, “The Button: The New Nuclear Arms Race and Presidential Power from Truman to Trump” (BenBella Books, 2020)
As we enter the third decade of the 21st century, American nuclear policy continues to be influenced by the legacies of the Cold War. Nuclear policies remain focused on easily identifiable threats, including China or Russia, and how the United States would respond in the event of a first strike... Read More