New Books Network

Michael Walzer, “A Foreign Policy for the Left” (Yale UP, 2018)
In my old age, I try to argue more quietly, though I still believe that sharp disagreement is a sign of political seriousness. What engaged citizens think and say matters; we should aim to get it right and to defeat those who get it wrong. I understand the very limited... Read More
James Simpson, “Permanent Revolution: The Reformation and the Illiberal Roots of Liberalism” (Harvard UP, 2019)
The Protestant Reformation looms large in our cultural imagination. In the standard telling, it’s the moment the world went modern. Casting off the shackles and superstitions of medieval Catholicism, reformers translated the Bible into the vernacular and democratized religion. In this story, it’s no wonder that Protestantism should give birth... Read More
Melissa Crouch, “The Constitution of Myanmar: A Contextual Analysis” (Hart, 2019)
The tail end of the twentieth century was a good time for constitutional lawyers. Leapfrogging around the globe, they offered advice on how to amend, write or rewrite one state constitution after the next following the collapse of the Soviet Union and with it, the communist bloc. Largely overlooked in... Read More
H. Shelest and M. Rabinovych, “Decentralization, Regional Diversity, and Conflict: The Case of Ukraine” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)
The articles presented in Decentralization, Regional Diversity, and Conflict: The Case of Ukraine (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) aim to explore the current political and administrative challenges that Ukraine is facing. The volume draws particular attention to the issues that have been escalated and intensified since the inception of the Russo-Ukrainian conflict.... Read More
Charles L. Zelden, “Bush v. Gore: Exposing the Growing Crisis in American Democracy” (UP of Kansas, 2020)
In this episode, Siobhan talks with Charles L. Zelden about the new expanded edition of his book, Bush v. Gore: Exposing the Growing Crisis in American Democracy (University Press of Kansas, 2020). Zelden is a professor in the Department of History and Political Science at Nova Southeastern University’s Halmos College of Arts... Read More
Alan Chong, “Critical Reflections on China’s Belt and Road Initiative” (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)
Political scientists Alan Chong and Quang Min Pham bring with their edited volume, Critical Reflections on China’s Belt and Road Initiative (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020), originality as well as dimensions and perspectives to the discussion about the Belt and Road that are highly relevant but often either unrecognized or underemphasized. The book... Read More
A. Wylegala and M. Glowacka-Grajper, “The Burden of the Past: History, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Ukraine” (Indiana UP, 2020)
The Burden of the Past: History, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Ukraine (Indiana UP, 2020), edited by Anna Wylegała and Małgorzata Głowacka-Grajper, (Indiana University Press, 2020) is an important contribution in the field of memory studies. The volume draws attention to Eastern Europe as a territory of complex memory clusters.... Read More
Wilson Chacko Jacob, “For God or Empire: Sayyid Fadl and the Indian Ocean World” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Sayyid Fadl, a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad, led a unique life—one that spanned much of the nineteenth century and connected India, Arabia, and the Ottoman Empire. For God or Empire: Sayyid Fadl and the Indian Ocean World (Stanford University Press) tells his story, part biography and part global history,... Read More
Mark Bevir and Jason Blakely, “Interpretive Social Science: An Anti-Naturalist Approach” (Oxford UP, 2018)
In Interpretive Social Science: An Anti-Naturalist Approach (Oxford University Press, 2018), Mark Bevir and Jason Blakely make a case for why interpretivism is the most philosophically cogent approach currently on offer in the social sciences, and for anti-naturalism as the best option among interpretivist alternatives. Part survey of existing approaches... Read More
C. Chan and F. de Londras, “China’s National Security: Endangering Hong Kong’s Rule of Law?” (Hart, 2020)
On July 1, 2020, China introduced a National Security Law into Hong Kong partly in an attempt to quell months of civil unrest, as a mechanism to safeguard China’s security. In this new book, China’s National Security: Endangering Hong Kong’s Rule of Law? (Hart, 2020), Cora Chan and Fiona de... Read More