New Books Network

Gavriel D. Rosenfeld, “The Fourth Reich: The Specter of Nazism from World War II to the Present” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
In his new book, The Fourth Reich: The Specter of Nazism from World War II to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Gavriel D. Rosenfeld reveals, for the first time, these postwar nightmares of a future that never happened and explains what they tell us about Western political, intellectual, and... Read More
Asa McKercher, “Canada and the World since 1867” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
If you haven’t been able to tell by the way I pronounce the word “about,” I should probably let you know that I’m from Canada. And I have to make a confession––growing up in Vancouver, I was fed the line that Canadian history was dull, that it lacked drama (i.e.... Read More
Shadaab Rahemtullah, “Qur’an of the Oppressed: Liberation Theology and Gender Justice in Islam” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Shadaab Rahemtullah‘s book Qur’an of the Oppressed: Liberation Theology and Gender Justice in Islam (Oxford University Press, 2017) offers a compelling comparative analysis of the works of four Muslim scholars of Islam – Asghar Ali Engineer, Farid Esack, Amina Wadud, and Asma Barlas. The book serves as an excellent introduction... Read More
Conor Picken and Matthew Dischinger, “Southern Comforts: Drinking and the US South” (LSU Press, 2020)
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Conor Picken and Matthew Dischinger about their edited collection, Southern Comforts: Drinking and the US South from Louisiana State University Press’s Southern Literary Studies Series. This collection of seventeen essays focuses on the mythologies and representations of alcohol production, distribution, and consumption... Read More
Katherine Franke, “Repair: Redeeming the Promise of Abolition” (Haymarket Books, 2020)
Katherine Franke’s ambitious new book challenges Americans to face our collective responsibility for ongoing racial inequality. Rather than fall back on what Franke calls a “palliative history” that emphasizes granting freedom and rights after the Civil War, Franke insists that Americans acknowledge the failure to provide any meaningful reparation to... Read More
Cassia Roth, “A Miscarriage of Justice: Women’s Reproductive Lives and the Law in Early Twentieth-Century Brazil” (Stanford UP, 2020)
While the negotiation of ideals of nationhood and citizenship have traditionally fallen under the purview of landmark court decisions, state reforms, and the political exigencies of statesmen, Cassia Roth‘s new book A Miscarriage of Justice: Women’s Reproductive Lives and the Law in Early Twentieth-Century Brazil (Stanford University Press, 2020) chooses to... Read More
Tim Rooney, “John Beilein at Michigan: A Basketball Revival” (McFarland, 2020)
When John Beilein arrived at University of Michigan in 2007, the once-proud men’s basketball program was adrift after the fallout from a scandal and failing to reach the NCAA Tournament for nine straight seasons. Beilein slowly re-built the program on the foundation of a strong culture, which emphasized teamwork, integrity... Read More