New Books Network

Rita Kesselring, “Bodies of Truth: Law, Memory, and Emancipation in Post-Apartheid South Africa” (Stanford UP, 2017)
Rita Kesselring’s important book Bodies of Truth: Law, Memory, and Emancipation in Post-Apartheid South Africa (Stanford University Press, 2017) seeks to understand the embodied and everyday effects of state-sponsored violence as well the limits of the law to produce social repair. Of particular interest in Kesselring’s theorizing of the relationship... Read More
Jolyon Baraka Thomas, “Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Jolyon Baraka Thomas’s Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan (University of Chicago Press, 2019) challenges the commonsensical notion that the Japanese empire granted its subjects no religious freedom—that, despite the legal provision in the Meiji Constitution of 1890 affirming freedom of worship, “State Shinto” was the law of the... Read More
Jon K. Lauck, “The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History” (U Iowa Press, 2013)
The guest this week on Historically Thinking is Jon Lauck. He’s the author of The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History (University of Iowa Press, 2013), which is several things at once: a brief illustration of the importance of the Midwest to both American and World History; the history... Read More
Nianshen Song, “Making Borders in Modern East Asia: The Tumen River Demarcation, 1881-1919” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Land borders in East Asia have played just as big a role in the region’s social transformations as their more recently debated maritime counterparts, and the boundary between China and Korea offers particularly telling insight into how society, identity and geopolitics have shifted over time. Nianshen Song’s Making Borders in... Read More
Matthew A. Sutton, “Double Crossed: The Missionaries Who Spied for the United States During the Second World War” (Basic Books, 2019)
What makes a good missionary makes a good spy. Or so thought “Wild” Bill Donovan when he secretly recruited a team of religious activists for the Office of Strategic Services. They entered into a world of lies, deception, and murder, confident that their nefarious deeds would eventually help them expand... Read More
David Lindsay Roberts, “Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans through History” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
The institutional history of mathematics in the United States comprises several entangled traditions—military, civil, academic, industrial—each of which merits its own treatment. David Lindsay Roberts, adjunct professor of mathematics at Prince George’s Community College, takes a very different approach. His unique book, Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans... Read More
Elena Albarrán, “Seen and Heard in Mexico: Children and Revolutionary Cultural Nationalism” (U Nebraska Press, 2014)
Elena Jackson Albarrán’s book Seen and Heard in Mexico: Children and Revolutionary Cultural Nationalism (University of Nebraska Press, 2014) explores the changing politics of childhood during the period 1920-1940, in the wake of the Mexican Revolution. That conflict, a civil war which brought down an authoritarian regime, came with new... Read More