New Books Network

Marion Kaplan, “Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal” (Yale UP, 2020)
Marion Kaplan’s riveting book,  Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal (Yale University Press) describes the dramatic experiences of Jewish refugees as they fled Hitler’s regime and then lived in limbo in Portugal until they could reach safer havens abroad. Drawing attention not only to the social and physical... Read More
Madina Tlostanova, “What Does it Mean to be Post-Soviet? Decolonial Art from the Ruins of the Soviet Empire” (Duke UP, 2018)
In What Does it Mean to be Post-Soviet? Decolonial Art from the Ruins of the Soviet Empire (Duke University Press, 2018), Madina Tlostanova traces how contemporary post-Soviet art mediates this human condition. Observing how the concept of the happy future—which was at the core of the project of Soviet modernity—has... Read More
Rae Linda Brown, “Heart of a Woman: The Life and Music of Florence B. Price” (U Illinois Press, 2020)
In 1933, the Chicago Symphony performed the Symphony in E Minor by Florence B. Price. It was the first time a major American orchestra played a composition by an African American woman. Despite her success, Price sank into obscurity after her death in 1953. Dr. Rae Linda Brown spent much... Read More
S. Daulatzai and J. Rana, “With Stones in Our Hands: Reflections on Racism, Muslims and US Empire” (U Minnesota Press, 2018)
In this current moment it has become increasingly clear that US society is deeply entangled in racist policies and logics of white supremacy. While this affects numerous communities, anti-Muslim racism has continued to grow over the years. In With Stones in Our Hands: Reflections on Racism, Muslims and US Empire (University of... Read More
Melissa Faliveno, “Tomboyland: Essays” (Topple Books and Little A, 2020)
Writers often evoke the famous que sais-je (“What do I know?”) of Michel de Montaigne, father of the literary essay. Montaigne was known for his deeply exploratory writing about the many overlapping and often conflicting aspects of selfhood. His Essais in the 16th century laid the foundation for the genre... Read More
Ting Zhang, “Circulating the Code: Print Media and Legal Knowledge in Qing China” (U Washington Press, 2020)
How could a peasant in Shandong in the Qing dynasty come to know enough about a specific law that he felt confident enough to kill his own wife and his lover’s husband and think that he could get away with it? As Ting Zhang’s new book, Circulating the Code: Print... Read More
Alice Connor, “Fierce: Women of the Bible and Their Stories of Violence, Mercy, Bravery, Wisdom, Sex, and Salvation” (Fortress, 2017)
Women in the Bible aren’t shy or retiring; they’re fierce and funny and demanding and relevant to 21st-century people. Women in the Bible—some of their names we know, others we’ve only heard, and others are tragically unnamed. In Fierce: Women of the Bible and Their Stories of Violence, Mercy, Bravery,... Read More
Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, “The Good Drone: How Social Movements Democratize Surveillance” (MIT Press, 2020)
The Good Drone: How Social Movements Democratize Surveillance (MIT Press), by Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, demonstrates that this technology – which is mostly associated with covert surveillance and remote warfare – has also served as a vital tool for activists, social movements, and defenders of human rights to effect pro-social campaigns. Through... Read More
John W. Compton, “The End of Empathy: Why White Protestants Stopped Loving their Neighbors” (Oxford UP, 2020)
We’re all familiar with the statistic that 81% of white evangelical voters supported Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election. But what if a deeper trawl through the complex relationship between religion and political activity in modern America suggests that statistic doesn’t really mean anything? In this exciting new book,... Read More