New Books Network

Thomas Borstelmann, “Just Like Us: The American Struggle to Understand Foreigners” (Columbia UP, 2020)
The American attitude towards outsiders has always been ambivalent. The United States, it is commonly said, is a nation of immigrants; today, it’s the most demographically diverse great power. But on the other side of that spectrum have been anxiety about and hatred for the foreign. And there’s no shortage... Read More
José Alamillo, “Deportes: The Making of a Sporting Mexican Diaspora” (Rutgers UP, 2020)
In Deportes: The Making of a Sporting Mexican Diaspora (Rutgers University Press, 2020), Professor José Alamillo, a specialist in Chicana/o Studies, Labor, and Sports history, examines the powerful way Mexican Americans have used sports to build transnational networks for personal and community empowerment across the United States and Mexico before... Read More
Costas Lapavitsas, “The Left Case Against the EU” (Polity, 2018)
Many on the Left see the European Union as a fundamentally benign project with the potential to underpin ever greater cooperation and progress. If it has drifted rightward, the answer is to fight for reform from within. In this iconoclastic polemic, economist Costas Lapavitsas demolishes this view. In The Left... Read More
Richard Breitman, “The Journal of Holocaust and Genocide Studies”(Oxford Academic/USHMM)
The Journal of Holocaust and Genocide Studies is turning twenty-five.  One of the first academic journals focused on the study of the Holocaust and Genocide Studies, it has been one of a few journals that led the field in new directions. So it seemed appropriate to mark the moment by talking with... Read More
John C. McManus, “Fire and Fortitude: The US Army in the Pacific War, 1941-1943 (Dutton Caliber, 2019)
For most Americans, the war the United States waged in the Pacific in the Second World War was one fought primarily by the Navy and the Marine Corps. As John C. McManus demonstrates in Fire and Fortitude: The US Army in the Pacific War, 1941-1943 (Dutton Caliber), however, this obscures... Read More
David Tavárez, “Words and Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America” (U Colorado Press, 2017)
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and anthropologists grappling with the big questions of the Christianization of Mexico after the Spanish Conquest and using sources in several... Read More
Adi Schwartz and Einat Wilf, “The War of Return: How Western Indulgence of the Palestinian Dream Has Obstructed the Path to Peace” (All Point Books, 2020)
Two prominent Israeli liberals argue that for the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians to end with peace, Palestinians must come to terms with the fact that there will be no “right of return.” In 1948, seven hundred thousand Palestinians were forced out of their homes by the first Arab-Israeli... Read More
Joshua Nall, “News from Mars: Mass Media and the Forging of a New Astronomy, 1860-1910” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2019)
In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re hearing an awful lot about the fraught relationship between science and media. In his book, News from Mars: Mass Media and the Forging of a New Astronomy, 1860-1910 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019), historian of science Joshua Nall shows us that a... Read More
J. Browning and T. Silver, “An Environmental History of the Civil War” (UNC Press, 2020)
This sweeping new history recognizes that the Civil War was not just a military conflict but also a moment of profound transformation in Americans’ relationship to the natural world. To be sure, environmental factors such as topography and weather powerfully shaped the outcomes of battles and campaigns, and the war... Read More